Wholesale Los Angeles Rams Jerseys

Los Angeles Rams
Los Angeles Rams

ORLANDO, Fla. — One day after adding star defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh, Rams coach Sean McVay fully embraced his team’s role in the current speculation about an even bigger star who could be coming to Los Angeles.

“Suh or the speculation about Odell?” McVay asked at the start of his one-hour breakfast session with reporters at the NFL’s annual meetings Tuesday. “Which one is it?”

The answer was the latter, as the Rams have a need at receiver and New York Giants decision-makers have been dropping hints about potentially trading star wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. McVay was careful to tiptoe around the league’s tampering rules, but he acknowledged the speculation about Beckham and indicated his team would continue to be active on all fronts.

“We can’t talk about anybody that’s under contract with any other team, but I think, if there’s one thing you can appreciate about what we’ve done this offseason, there’s no trade we wouldn’t explore or look into if we feel like it can upgrade us as a team,” said McVay, whose Rams are having one of the busiest offseasons in the NFL. “Hypothetically, I think a player of his caliber can kind of really do everything, but like I said, we really don’t get into discussing players that are with other teams, just out of respect for tampering and the things that come with that.”

Giants owner John Mara and coach Pat Shurmur have both made comments this week that seem to have left open the door for a Beckham trade. Beckham is scheduled to make about $8.5 million this year, the fifth-year option season of his rookie contract, and there’s been an expectation around the team and the league that he wouldn’t show up for offseason work without a new deal.

As co-owner Steve Tisch said Monday, that’s all hypothetical at this point, but there’s been enough controversy around Beckham that the Giants likely would listen to offers if aggressive teams such as the Rams were to make them. At this point, two Giants sources said Monday, there are no active discussions that they believe would lead to a Beckham deal.

McVay said the Rams’ current management group has done “a great job of exploring all avenues to upgrade our football team. And whatever that is, if it’s free agency, if it’s through the draft or whether it’s just re-signing our own, those are things we’re going to explore and do. Being able to play in such a unique environment and atmosphere like L.A., it provides a unique opportunity to take advantage of that, and that’s something that we want to be proactive about.”

The Rams have overhauled their defense this offseason, trading away linebacker Alec Ogletree and defensive end Robert Quinn, and acquiring Suh in free agency and cornerbacks Marcus Peters and Aqib Talib in trades. Those three newcomers are known as big personalities, but McVay said he didn’t anticipate any problems because defensive coordinator Wade Phillips “has more swag than all of them, so we should be in good shape.”

McVay did say Suh and incumbent Rams superstar defensive tackle Aaron Donald had been in touch with each other during the team’s recruitment of Suh. Donald’s contract situation, like Beckham’s, remains unsettled, as he’s also going into his fifth year on a $6.9 million option that’s well below his market value. The Rams and Donald discussed an extension last offseason but couldn’t agree on one, and Donald held out in protest until Sept. 9, missing the first game of the season. But adding Suh, McVay said, isn’t going to ruffle Donald’s feathers.

“Ndamukong and Aaron have both talked to each other as this has gone on,” McVay said. “It’s very important when you talk about a player like an Aaron Donald, ‘Hey, here comes Ndamukong. How do you feel about a player like that?’ I think the mutual respect that exists between those two players was imperative and really paramount to be able to pursue this in the first place. They felt good about it.”

Wholesale Miami Dolphins Jerseys

The New York Giants signed former Miami Dolphins safety Michael Thomas, the team announced Monday.

Thomas received a two-year deal, a source told ESPN.

Thomas, 28, was a captain each of the past two years for the Dolphins.

Thomas was also one of several Miami players to protest social injustices for minorities by kneeling during the national anthem. The protests have been a topic of discussion this past week after notable free-agent safety Eric Reid said his involvement in them is the reason he still has not been signed.

Thomas began his career with the San Francisco 49ers as an undrafted free agent out of Stanford. The versatile defensive back — who can play both safety spots and nickel cornerback — has 25 career starts in his five seasons with the Dolphins.

Thomas also could improve the Giants’ special teams coverage. His 55 special teams tackles over the past four seasons tied him for the league lead. He also led the Dolphins with 11 special teams tackles in 2017 and tied for the league lead with 19 special teams tackles in 2016.

Thomas comes to the Giants as a familiar face to defensive backs coach Lou Anarumo, who was his position coach in Miami. Anarumo joined the Giants this offseason after six seasons with the Dolphins.

The Giants were looking for a veteran safety this offseason to add to their defensive backfield, where Landon Collins and Darian Thompson were the starters. Thompson had his ups and downs in his first year as a starter, even though he played the most snaps out of anybody on the defense.

Wholesale Minnesota Vikings Jerseys

Minnesota Vikings
Minnesota Vikings22

After agreeing to a very lucrative contract a week ago, Kirk Cousins is set to be the new starting quarterback for the Minnesota Vikings.

Some still question why the Minnesota Vikings felt it necessary to give $84 million to a quarterback who only has one playoff start in his NFL career.

But the Vikings bringing in Kirk Cousins to be their starting quarterback is not as much about his past as it is about what he can accomplish in the future.

Cousins has shown in his career that he has the tools to be among the best signal callers in the entire NFL. And with Minnesota, he will be surrounded by arguably the most talent on an offense than he has ever had before.

Pairing Cousins with the players in their offense is just one of the many reasons the Vikings are happy to have him as their quarterback for the next few years. What are some of the other reasons Minnesota and their fans should be excited about when it comes to their brand new starting signal caller?

Wholesale New England Patriots Jerseys

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — New England Patriots special-teams captain Matthew Slater has reached agreement on a two-year deal to return to the club, according to a league source.

The two-year deal gives Slater, who entered the NFL as a fifth-round draft choice of the Patriots in 2008, a chance to spend his career with just one team. That is something his father, Pro Football Hall of Famer Jackie Slater, did by playing 20 years with the Rams.
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Matthew Slater took a free-agent visit to the Pittsburgh Steelers last week, according to ESPN’s Field Yates. That seemed to reflect that Slater’s return to New England was uncertain. Then the club traded for Cordarrelle Patterson, who could fill some of the same coverage roles that Slater has on special teams.

Slater, who in 2017 won the NFL’s Bart Starr Award — given to the player who exemplifies character and leadership — is one of the Patriots’ inspirational and spiritual leaders. He’s also a perennial Pro Bowl player, having been selected to play in the game in each of the past seven seasons. That ties Steve Tasker for the most special teams Pro Bowl nods in NFL history.

He had seven special-teams tackles in nine regular-season games last season, often commanding double-team blocks from the opposition.

Wholesale New Orleans Saints Jerseys

New Orleans Saints
New Orleans Saints

A breakdown of the New Orleans Saints’ 2018 free-agent signings.
Alex Okafor, DE

The Saints brought back one of their best free-agent signings from 2017, agreeing to a two-year deal with defensive end Alex Okafor, per a source. Here’s a closer look at the signing:

Grade: A-minus. Okafor is coming back from a torn Achilles, which makes him something of a question mark. But that was factored into his price tag, which is “up to $10 million” over two years, per a source — presumably including some incentives. If Okafor plays anywhere near his 2017 level, that will be a great bargain. I had DE listed as the Saints’ No. 1 need this offseason, and they kept Okafor away from a division rival after he visited with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

What it means: Okafor is expected to be fully healthy in time for training camp. If he can return to form, he should once again be the Saints’ No. 2 starting end opposite from first-team All-Pro Cameron Jordan — with the ability to move inside in certain packages. Okafor played roughly 80 percent of the Saints’ snaps on defense last year while starting all 10 games he played. The Saints could still look to add a dynamic edge rusher to the rotation, perhaps in the draft. But they now have solid depth that also includes second-year pro Trey Hendrickson and veteran George Johnson. And they are a considering a major upgrade to their interior defensive line as they visit with free agent Ndamukong Suh on Friday.

What’s the risk: Obviously there is a health risk, since a torn Achilles is a major injury. But the Saints clearly felt comfortable enough with his progress to bring him back. Also, 2017 was something of a career breakout for the 27-year-old veteran after he battled injuries and played more of a part-time role during his first four years with the Arizona Cardinals. Clearly, the fit with the Saints was a great one for both sides, though. His re-signing felt like a no-brainer.
Jermon Bushrod, OL

The Saints are bringing back another blast from the past — versatile veteran offensive lineman Jermon Bushrod — to replace versatile backup Senio Kelemete. Here’s a closer look at the signing:

Grade: B. The Saints know Bushrod well after he spent his first six years in New Orleans from 2007 to 2012, winning a Super Bowl and going to two Pro Bowls as their starting left tackle. More importantly, the 33-year-old has spent the past two years as the Miami Dolphins’ starting right guard, which gives him the versatility to be the kind of “super-utility” backup that Kelemete was.

What it means: Bushrod won’t be a projected starter, with the Saints already loaded at both tackle spots (Terron Armstead, Ryan Ramczyk) and both guard spots (Larry Warford, Andrus Peat). But they were suddenly starving for proven depth and insurance after longtime veteran Zach Strief announced his retirement and Kelemete was signed away by the Houston Texans. Bushrod battled foot and wrist injuries in a bit of a down year with the Dolphins in 2017. But assuming he gets back to full health, he should be a reliable option to fill in at all four spots when needed. And that’s hugely important — as the Saints showed last year when projected backups Ramczyk and Kelemete wound up starting a total of 27 games, including the playoffs.

What’s the risk: I’m assuming this will be a minimal deal (the financials haven’t been reported yet), so there’s really no risk. But obviously Bushrod is a little bit of an unknown at this late stage of his career. So the Saints would still be wise to target some young depth across the offensive line. But his combination of experience and familiarity with the Saints should serve him well.
Tom Savage, QB

The Saints swapped out veteran backup quarterbacks Wednesday, agreeing to a deal with former Houston Texans signal-caller Tom Savage after they lost Chase Daniel to the Chicago Bears. Here’s a closer look at the signing:

Grade: B-plus. Assuming Savage doesn’t cost very much (the financials aren’t available yet), what’s not to like? The Saints needed a backup option after the Bears paid Daniel a lot of money. And Savage has a good combination of starting experience and potential at 27 years old.

What it means: Savage might not even win the backup job, since Sean Payton is so high on second-year pro Taysom Hill (an athletic dual-threat QB who spent last summer with the Green Bay Packers after going undrafted out of BYU). In fact, Payton has gushed so much over Hill you would almost label Savage as the “dark horse” in the competition. Plus, there is always the possibility the Saints could draft a quarterback early, though it seems unlikely this year, since they don’t pick until 27th in Round 1 and don’t have a second-round pick. But all that said, Savage seems like the perfect kind of low-risk veteran to take a flier on. The 2014 fourth-round draft pick went into last season as Houston’s starter before rookie sensation Deshaun Watson replaced him at halftime of the opener. The 6-foot-4, 230-pounder has started a total of nine games over the past two seasons with a 2-7 record. He has a career completion percentage of 57.5 with five touchdowns and seven interceptions.

What’s the risk: Obviously it’s a huge risk if Drew Brees gets injured and the Saints don’t have a proven backup. But they have never spent much on their backup QB during the Payton-Brees era. And if they don’t like what they see from Savage or Hill this summer, maybe they can sweet-talk Luke McCown back to New Orleans for more security. Other than that, I like the idea of giving a quarterback guru like Payton as many talented prospects as possible to audition.
Demario Davis, LB

The Saints are signing veteran linebacker Davis away from the New York Jets with a three-year, $24 million contract, sources told ESPN’s Dianna Russini. Here’s a closer look at the signing:

Grade: C-minus. I like the player, but I have questions about the fit and the value at $8 million per year. Davis, 29, is an inside linebacker and veteran leader who just had his career-best season with 135 tackles and five sacks while playing every snap for the Jets. But he sounds an awful lot like current Saints inside linebackers A.J. Klein, Manti Te’o and Craig Robertson. Davis is not an athletic outside linebacker who excels in pass coverage, which is what the Saints really need.

What it means: I’ll be curious to find out. I’m not sure how the Saints can fit Davis, Klein, Te’o and Robertson all on the roster — especially considering they so often use two linebackers on passing downs. Davis (6-foot-2, 248 pounds) and Klein both have the ability to be every-down players at Mike and Sam. So perhaps Te’o will be the odd man out, even though he was solid as a part-time starter and injury replacement for Klein at a cheap price last season. Davis was outstanding for the Jets after he helped to facilitate a trade back to New York by taking a pay cut (he began his career with the Jets in 2012 before spending one season with the Cleveland Browns in 2016). Davis also reportedly dedicated himself to a better diet and workout program. Pro Football Focus rated him as the best free-agent linebacker in the NFL this year, though ESPN had him ranked No. 62 overall among all free agents heading into Wednesday. Davis battled some inconsistency early in his career, but he has never missed a game and has had at least 90 tackles in each of the past five seasons.

What’s the risk: Just like with their earlier signing on Wednesday (cornerback Patrick Robinson), the Saints are paying a premium for an “older” player who is coming off a career-best season. ESPN’s Rich Cimini reported earlier this offseason that the Jets were interested in bringing Davis back — but that they saw him in the $3 million to $4 million range. Other than that, Davis would hardly be labeled as “risky” considering his history of durability and the intangible leadership qualities he brings.
Patrick Robinson, CB

The Saints reunited with Robinson, their first-round pick in 2010 who spent the past three years with the Chargers, Colts and Eagles. Here’s a closer look at the signing:

Grade: B-minus. I’m a little torn here, since Robinson struggled during most of his five years in New Orleans before a change of scenery served him well. (He had his best season yet as a slot cornerback in Philadelphia last year.) But if the Saints are getting the older and improved version, then Robinson, 30, will fill one of their biggest needs. And I like the value at four years and $20 million, per a source.

What it means: The Saints’ secondary was vastly improved last year, thanks to the breakouts of NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year Marshon Lattimore and second-year pro Ken Crawley at cornerback and rookie Marcus Williams at free safety. But they made the nickel/slot cornerback position a top priority in free agency — especially since they decided to let safety Kenny Vaccaro go after he often manned the slot in the past. Robinson was one of the best slot cornerbacks in the NFL last year in Philly, with four interceptions and a whopping 18 passes defensed in the regular season, plus another huge interception that he returned for a touchdown in the NFC Championship Game. The Saints also signed free-agent safety Kurt Coleman as a smart veteran to lead a young secondary that also includes versatile third-year pro Vonn Bell. So the secondary feels pretty stacked now.

What’s the risk: The Saints are paying premium value for a guy who has battled highs and lows throughout his career — especially during his time in New Orleans. (Philly, by contrast, got Robinson on a one-year veteran minimum deal last year after he battled injuries and inconsistent play in Indianapolis.) But Robinson and the rest of the NFL have had plenty of time now to figure out where he fits best, which he showed while playing part time in the slot in both New Orleans and San Diego. Robinson has admitted that he wasn’t mentally strong enough to handle the roller coaster early in his career (which included a rough year in his one season as a full-time starter in 2012, followed by a major knee injury in 2013). But the Saints kept showing faith in him, and he showed some glimpses of improvement in 2014 before having success in San Diego and Philadelphia. The Saints have clearly never lost that faith in him.
Drew Brees, QB

The Saints signed Brees to a two-year, $50 million extension. Here’s a closer look at the signing:

Grade: A. The Saints got a discount on this deal, which only included $27 million guaranteed (nearly $60 million less than deals for Kirk Cousins, Jimmy Garoppolo and Matthew Stafford). A source said that at least one other team was willing to offer two years and $60 million guaranteed for the future Hall of Famer.

What it means: Eventually the Saints will move on from Brees if his production starts to decline or if they’re ever in position to draft an elite replacement. But neither of those things is true this year. Brees, 39, still played at a Pro Bowl level last year while setting the NFL record for completion percentage (72.0) and helping the Saints return to the playoffs for the first time in four years. And because he is now flanked by a loaded offensive line, dynamic run game and rising young defense, the Saints don’t need him to be Superman (he threw for his fewest yards and touchdowns in his 12 years with the team last season). The Saints nearly drafted Patrick Mahomes II with the 11th pick in 2017. But it seems unlikely they’ll get a chance at a top prospect this year, since they don’t pick until No. 27 in Round 1 and don’t have a second-round pick.

What’s the risk: Well, Brees turns 40 next year. So eventually he’s bound to start declining. But that’s why the Saints have been so intent on paying him just one year at a time — and they’re lucky he has been willing to play ball. There’s also a risk with paying any player $25 million (roughly one-seventh of the salary cap). No team has won a Super Bowl with a QB costing more than $20 million against the cap yet, partly due to Tom Brady’s history of hometown discounts in New England. But that’s the going rate for elite quarterbacks, so you’re darned if you do and darned if you don’t.
George Johnson, DE

The New Orleans Saints re-signed veteran defensive end George Johnson to a one-year deal, according to ESPN’s Field Yates. Here’s a closer look at the signing:

Grade: B-plus. This move feels like a no-brainer after Johnson signed with the Saints last December and played so well down the stretch. The 30-year-old is not the game-changer they need at the position, but he proved he can provide valuable depth.

What it means: I still have defensive end ranked as the Saints’ No. 1 need. They need an impact player on the opposite end from first-team All-Pro Cameron Jordan. And it’s unclear if Alex Okafor can be that guy again, since Okafor is coming off of a torn Achilles and remains unsigned as a free agent. But Johnson is obviously a good fit for the rotation. The former Buccaneers, Vikings and Lions journeyman came in last December and racked up 2.5 sacks in his first two games. Then he started both of New Orleans’ playoff games.

What’s the risk: Not much, since I assume this is a veteran-minimum deal — and since the Saints won’t be counting on Johnson to be their full-time starter. The 6-foot-4, 265-pounder started just five games with six sacks in his eight-year career before joining the Saints. And strangely, all six of those sacks came in 2014 with Detroit.
Kurt Coleman, S

The New Orleans Saints got a jump start on free agency Friday night, agreeing to a three-year contract with veteran safety Kurt Coleman after he was released by the rival Carolina Panthers. Here’s a closer look at the signing:

Grade: B. It’s not quite a blockbuster, since Coleman has never made a Pro Bowl during a very good eight-year career. But the 29-year-old fills a big need for a Saints team that is planning to let longtime starter Kenny Vaccaro leave in free agency. Coleman is a versatile free safety/strong safety and a respected leader who was voted as a captain in Carolina last year. He should be just as valuable off the field as on it.

What it means: This move reminds me a lot of the one New Orleans made last year when it poached veteran linebacker A.J. Klein from the Panthers in free agency. The Saints need a steady veteran leader for their young secondary, where their top four players all have two years of experience or fewer (CBs Marshon Lattimore and Ken Crawley; safeties Marcus Williams and Vonn Bell). And Coleman is a smart player who was praised for being that type of leader for a young Panthers secondary in the past three years. The Saints clearly know the Panthers’ personnel as well as anybody, and they also had success when they signed veteran receiver Ted Ginn Jr. away from Carolina last year.

Coleman (5-foot-11, 208 pounds) will battle Bell for the starting strong safety job, but both of them should play a lot because New Orleans features so many three-safety packages. Coleman’s best season came as a free safety in 2015, when he had seven interceptions in the regular season and two more in the playoffs to help lead Carolina to a Super Bowl. But he has also played a lot of strong safety, and the Saints will like that flexibility. A seventh-round pick in 2010, Coleman has 74 career regular-season starts, five playoff starts and 23 career interceptions (including the playoffs) with the Philadelphia Eagles, Kansas City Chiefs and Panthers.

Lastly, as a nice bonus that really doesn’t guarantee anything, Coleman is from Ohio State — which has become a gold mine for New Orleans in recent years (Lattimore, Ginn, Bell and receiver Michael Thomas).

What’s the risk: The full details of the contract haven’t been released yet, but the NFL Network reported it’s worth up to $18 million, with $6.5 million in Year 1. That’s a pretty significant investment, so Coleman needs to prove that he still has some good years left after his 30th birthday this summer. The Panthers obviously deemed him expendable after he went from seven interceptions in 2015 to four in 2016 and zero last year. I’m obviously being optimistic when I compare the move to the Klein deal. It could also be compared to the Saints’ 2016 signing of veteran linebacker James Laurinaitis, which didn’t work out as well.

The Saints burned Coleman in his last game when they got him to bite on a Thomas route before throwing an 80-yard TD pass to Ginn in the playoffs. But Coleman has snagged two interceptions and forced two fumbles against the Saints in the past three years, too. And the Saints obviously developed a healthy respect for him, aggressively moving to sign him during the NFL scouting combine, where he reportedly also drew interest from the Cincinnati Bengals and New York Giants, among others.

Wholesale New York Giants Jerseys

The New York Giants have released cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, the team announced Sunday.

Rodgers-Cromartie, 31, was entering the final year of a five-year, $35 million contract. He would have counted $8.5 million against the salary cap in 2018, and the Giants will save $6.5 million by releasing him.

Rodgers-Cromartie thanked the Giants in an Instagram post Sunday morning:

Before releasing him, the Giants had asked Rodgers-Cromartie to take a pay cut, but he declined. They also considered trying him at free safety, a source told ESPN’s Jordan Raanan. The two-time Pro Bowler has played cornerback his entire 10-year career, starting on the outside early in his career before being shifted inside to the slot the past two seasons.

Rodgers-Cromartie has 30 career interceptions but had none in 2017 after matching his career high with six in 2016. He was suspended for one game last season by then-coach Ben McAdoo for leaving practice without permission.

He insisted he mishandled the events leading to his suspension in October, both in how he acted during a game against the Los Angeles Chargers on Oct. 8 and two days later when McAdoo told him he would be inactive for a trip to Denver.

“To be honest, Coach called me up and he said some things and I kind of didn’t agree with it and I handled it the wrong way,” Rodgers-Cromartie said then. “At the end of the day, that’s on me. So the suspension, I take that. All I can do is try to work back to get in good grace with the guys. I’m just glad that they didn’t let this turn them from me and they accepted me and I’m just back working, man.”

Janoris Jenkins remains the only proven cornerback on the Giants, with troubled Eli Apple still on the roster and potentially slated to replace Rodgers-Cromartie in the lineup.

Wholesale New York Jets Jerseys

The New York Jets are doing their homework on Baker Mayfield. Lots of homework.

In the market for a quarterback, the Jets will be in Oklahoma for a private workout and they will have the Heisman Trophy winner at their facility for a pre-draft visit, he told themmqb.com.

They already met with Mayfield at the Senior Bowl and the NFL scouting combine. That’s a lot of Mayfield. Does it mean the Jets are targeting him in the draft?

Maybe, maybe not.

Keep in the mind the Jets will have 30 players for pre-draft visits, the league limit, many of whom will have multiple meetings with the team. It certainly means the Jets are performing their due diligence on Mayfield, the flag-planting, crotch-grabbing star whose behavior and background (which includes an arrest) demands scrutiny.

“You get a small window with them” at the combine, general manager Mike Maccagnan said. “In some cases, you get more exposure to these players when you go to their pro days and you’re around them in that environment. Sometimes you’ll schedule private workouts with them. Sometimes we’ll bring them in for visits at our facility, so we get a lot more opportunities to see them.”

The Jets have the sixth pick in the draft. If they don’t sign free agent Kirk Cousins, they could use their first-round pick on a quarterback. Josh Allen, Sam Darnold and Josh Rosen are the other top quarterback prospects. They, too, could get a once-over from the Jets.

Wholesale Philadelphia Eagles Jerseys

Philadelphia Eagles
Philadelphia Eagles

Another day of interviews, workouts and testing wrapped up Sunday at the NFL Combine in Indianapolis.

Defensive linemen, edge rushers and linebackers went through on-field testing and drills, while defensive backs completed the bench press.

You can check out all the results over on NFL.com, but there’s a look at a Philadelphia Eagles-focused wrap up.

Edge rushers showcase some impressive physical traits

— NFL.com’s Ian Rapoport reported Sunday that the Eagles are working with defensive end Vinny Curry on restructuring his contract, and Curry’s ultimate fate — whether it’s a trade, release or neither — could impact what the Eagles need at defensive end. They drafted Derek Barnett in the first round last year, a move that paid off, and the Eagles showed that having a deep rotation of pass rushers who they can keep fresh is a winning strategy.

— Georgia’s Lorenzo Carter ran a 4.50 in the 40, and his 130-inch broad jump showcased some explosiveness. He was projected as a second or third-round pick entering the combine, and he could be on the move up after posting those numbers.

— Ogbonnia Okoronkwo of Oklahoma projects as a solid prospect, and he backed that up with his performance. Analysts don’t see Okoronkwo as an instant-impact prospect, so he could be an option if the Eagles want to boost their depth.

— It will be hard for either of these prospects to drop into the Eagles range at the end of the first round, but Florida State’s Josh Sweat and Boston College’s Harold Landry had good Sundays. Sweat measured in at nearly 6-foot-5, 251 pounds with a wingspan of 84 1/8 inches, and that was before he ran a 4.53 40 and posted a 39.5-inch vertical. Sweat’s testing might bump him into the first round. Landry checked in at 6-foot-2, 252 pounds and ran a 4.64 40 and posted 24 reps in the bench press.

— The Eagles might be in the position to add another body to the middle of their defensive line, depending on what happens with Beau Allen’s contract this offseason. Washington’s Vita Vea is one of the top defensive tackles, and while he’ll likely be gone by the time the Eagles pick at No. 32, it’s worth highlighting his 41 reps at 225 in the bench press and 5.10 40.

— Virginia Tech’s Tim Settle checked in at 6-foot-2, 329 pounds, and while some of his numbers — 5.37 in the 40, 23.5 inches in the vertical jump and 96 inches in the broad jump — don’t jump off the page, he seems like he could be an interesting project for an NFL team, including the Eagles.

— Da’Shawn Hand signed with Alabama in the Class of 2014 as the nation’s No. 1 recruit, but he never quite matched production with hype during his college career. But Hand’s measurables at the combine show someone who can be a physical presence on a defense. If the Eagles can somehow pick up a second or third-round pick, it might be worth keeping Hand’s name in mind.

Draft’s top linebackers turn in some eye-catching performances

— Linebacker could emerge as a need for the Eagles depending on what happens with Nigel Bradham and Mychal Kendricks. And even if the Birds hang on to one or both of those players, it might be nice for the Birds to add a youth infusion to Jim Schwartz’s unit.

— Arizona State’s Christian Sam is a potential mid-round pick, and he was solid Sunday with a 4.75 40 and a 114-inch broad jump. NFL.com’s grade for him gives him the chance to become an NFL starter.

— Ohio State’s Jerome Baker has a great physical frame at 6-foot-1, 229 pounds, and he added some solid testing numbers to that. He ran the 40 in 4.53 seconds, posted 22 reps in the bench press and covered 126 inches in the broad jump. The Eagles don’t have a second or third round pick right now — which is where Baker projects — but he’s the type of prospect who could fall. Then maybe the Eagles could snag him.

— Shaquem Griffin has been an inspirational story during the combine. First, it was his 20 reps in the bench press while using a prosthetic on his left arm. Then Sunday it was his 40 time of 4.38 seconds, which led all linebackers. Griffin is projected as a mid-round pick, but it’s clear the team that selects him will get a top notch athlete.